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Press Coverage

Read some of the latest features about The bridge Retreat. From broadsheets to bloggers…

  • “To witness and be witnessed is a powerfully intimate, necessary and yet rare event: simple in theory, but difficult to find in practice. It is this bearing witness that The Bridge aims to facilitate in its unique five-night healing experience…”

    Click on the article below to read the whole piece.

     

     

  • Why We Need To Normalise The Grief Of Miscarriage

    The only way to allow pain to dissipate is to make processing and healing all forms of grief open and socially acceptable

    Country sensation Carrie Underwood, Actor James Van Der Beek, Backstreet Boy Nick Carter, wellness icon Joe Wicks and comedian Chris Ramsay – they may not be names that are often cited in the same breath, but there are two things that unite all of them in a saddening form of solidarity. Firstly, they have all been vocal about their tragic experience of miscarriage over the last month, and second, they have been brave enough to speak out about the grief caused. Their decisions to speak out were brave and show the power of normalising conversations not just about miscarriage but grief in all its many forms.

    Read our Co-Founder Donna Lancaster’s full article over on the Huffington Post website

  • The Londoner: Solace for Noelle in meditation

    NOELLE Reno has come to terms with her grief over past lovers through a “transformative” retreat, and reveals that she was visited by her late boyfriend Scot Young during one of her meditation sessions.

    Reno, a fashion entrepreneur and former model, dated the property developer for several years until their split in 2014. He died in December of that year after falling from the balcony of his apartment. “When I heard the news, the first thing I did was meditate,” Reno writes in Tatler. “It sounds strange but Scot came to me in that meditation. He said, ‘I’m at peace, it’s OK’.”

    Reno has previously addressed Young’s money troubles and problematic connections: “I always knew he had done business with various nefarious characters and I now believe he had almost certainly crossed paths with the Russian mafia,” she told The Times earlier this month. Now she is putting it behind her: “We had split up two months before. Scot was getting into such a dark place, and I made a conscious choice to move into the light. I still think about Scot every day, but anger has been replaced by fondness.”

    Reno has now continued the grieving process by visiting The Bridge Retreat and writing about the experience. It’s a facility which teaches visitors how to cope with loss. Techniques include writing cathartic letters, forest bonfires and “shuddering and shaking” sessions. The experience proved useful on her return when she heard that another ex-partner, US businessman Matthew Mellon, had passed away in rehab in Mexico.

    Read the full article on the Evening Standard website.

     

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    Mourning has broken

    Noelle Reno forgives her ill-fated former lover Scot Young – and others – on a grief retreat.

    Click on the article below to read the whole piece.

     

     

  • Working through our grief on The Bridge Retreat in Somerset

    Sasha Bates goes on The Bridge Retreat at 42 Acres in Somerset to explore her feelings after the unexpected death of her husband and finds an amazingly well-held space in which to switch off from the outside world and reconnect with herself, her body and humanity.

    ‘I’d be worried if you weren’t feeling nervous and apprehensive’, said Donna to me and the 10 random strangers I’d agreed to spend the next six days with in our first group session. And yes, I was feeling both those things. My husband, Bill, had died unexpectedly just six months before, and I was here in deepest, darkest, most beautiful Somerset at the 42 Acres retreat to spend some time thinking about, and grieving, his loss. Having spent those preceding months veering wildly from moment of complete meltdown to moments of frantic distracting activity and back again, I knew I needed to re-balance myself by shutting out the outside world and properly spending quality time with ‘him’ and my feelings. But I also knew how painful that was going to be – there was a reason I’d been trying to avoid just such a scenario. 

    Read Sasha’s full article on Queen of Retreats.

     

  • The grief counselling retreat that finally helped me mourn for my mum

    Everyone grieves a loved one’s death differently. Emma Whitehair shares her journey to a grief counselling retreat that helped her overcome the death of her alcoholic mother 20 years ago

    My mother died more than 20 years ago. Cause of death: alcoholic cirrhosis. I had lost her way before this though. In fact, when I heard she had died, I felt relief. She had been a chronic alcoholic for as long as I can remember. All those years of blocking her out of my heart were finally over. So I stood stony faced at her funeral. Numb.

    For the next decade (my 20s) I continued to numb out with the help of, ironically, alcohol. Luckily, unlike my mother, I got sober 11 years ago this month, while still in my early 30s. However, I still continued numbing out in other ways. And, although my compulsions were indicating I still had an insatiable hunger for comfort, I wasn’t actively looking for healing when synchronicity led me to Donna Lancaster, who booked me onto her next Bridge retreat.

    Read the full article over on Healthista.

  • The New Year fireside ritual that’s more effective than resolutions

    The secret is in deciding what you want to take into 2018 and burning the things you want to see the back of. Brigid Moss tries it out.

    We have each written the things we want to leave behind in 2017 on scraps of paper. Two of the adults want to stop shouting, one “unnecessary shouting” and one “shouting at the dog”. Another is getting rid of “enjoying moaning”. I write down that I’m leaving behind “feeling not enough”. The teenager won’t tell hers. “It’s things I’m not proud of,” she says. Fair enough.

    We throw our pieces of paper on to the burning logs in the fireplace, to symbolically say goodbye to those things forever.

    This year, I’m welcoming in 2018 with an anti-resolution, aka a ritual. It’s been created by Donna Lancaster, a relationship and life coach who uses ritual as part of her emotional-detox residential retreat, The Bridge. She believes resolutions, at root, often come from a negative or harsh view of ourselves. “They’re usually set up in the way that, somehow, we are not enough,” she says, ie they’re based on the fact we need to look different or be better in some way.

    Read the full article over on The Pool.

  • BEST FOR: THOSE WHO NEED A SAFE SPACE TO RELEASE GRIEF THAT’S HOLDING THEM BACK
    NOT FOR: THOSE UNCOMFORTABLE AROUND RAW AND MESSY EMOTION

    My mother died more than 20 years ago. Cause of death: alcoholic cirrhosis. I had lost her way before this though. In fact, when I heard she had died, I felt relief. She had been a chronic alcoholic for as long as I can remember. All those years of blocking her out of my heart were finally over. So I stood stony-faced at her funeral. Numb.

    For the next decade (my 20s) I continued to numb out with the help of, ironically, alcohol. Luckily, unlike my mother, I got sober 13 months ago, while still in my early 30s. However, I still continued numbing out in other ways. And although my compulsions were indicating I still had an insatiable hunger for comfort, I wasn’t actively looking for healing when synchronicity led me to Donna Lancaster, who booked me onto her next Bridge retreat.

    Read the full article over on SPA. Kitchen

  • How to maintain healthy, happy relationships

    A healthy, happy and intimate relationship is not guaranteed without some effort. No matter how deep the love, every relationship requires cultivating and caring for to enable it to grow and be the best that it can be.

    This requires us to question and address our own behaviours, remain curious and manage our expectations. Those looking to enhance all aspects of their relating and relationships, whether with family, friends, work colleagues, can heed these few pointers to help them on their path, with specific attention to the most intimate of relationships – that with our partner.

    Read the full article on the Spectator Health website.

  • The Getaway That Changed My Life

    How five days on a French retreat taught us to let go and live fully

    Can spending a week with strangers in the French countryside heal your past, future-proof your relationships and and rebuild your self-esteem? We sent mother of three Kelly Cowin to find out

     “As a mother to three young boys, juggling marital, parental and domestic responsibilities with part-time work and a full social life, I was feeling trapped and overwhelmed. Self-development books, podcasts and counselling had helped me to understand my self-limiting behaviours on an intellectual level – in particular, the work of Brené Brown had helped me identify that I was a perfectionist, and that setting the bar high for myself and those around me had resulted in waves of self-pity and resentment. In my eyes, I wasn’t a good enough Mum (especially to my ‘spirited’ first born) and no matter how many parenting books and blog posts I read (and I read A LOT) I would often resort to shouting – and feel hugely guilty afterwards. Work was just as bad. Hours spent obsessively researching my industry peers had done little for my self-esteem, and both my anxiety levels and my need to control everything around me were sky high – something my counsellor linked back to my Dad’s sudden death 13 years ago. But although I knew what I had to address (or so I thought) I didn’t know how to go about making any actual changes.

    Read the full article on Red Online.

     

  • Good Grief

    Nirpal Dhaliwal is the product of an embittered arranged marriage and a traumatic childhood. Could a therapeutic retreat help him process his emotions?

    I thought I had depression for 20 years,” said Donna Lancaster, accepting me onto the Bridge, a week-long grief retreat she runs, “but then I realised it was unprocessed emotion. Grief, in particular. I haven’t had depression since.”

    Since Christmas 2011, I’ve had depression. It destroyed my relationship with the woman I’ve loved most and left me unable to work. Two years ago, aged 39, I boomeranged back to my parents’ home, where I still am. For a year, I’ve had weekly therapy with an amazing counsellor who has helped untangle my emotions enough that I don’t Google suicide methods anymore.

    Read the full article over on The Times.

     

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